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VENEER SPLICING

VENEER SPLICING

When it is necessary to use two or more pieces (leaves) of veneer on the same surface, the leaves are aligned at the cut edge. Using different alignments almost limitless and unique visual effects can be attained.

BOOK MATCH

An advantage to using Flat Sliced Veneers, is that the layers are

piled consecutively as they come off the machinery. This allows the

manufacturer to sell the veneer in matched panels, which are

matched together like bookends. This type of veneer matching is called "book match." The resulting veneer joints match in a symmetrical pattern, allowing maximum continuity of the grain across the panel.

SLIP MATCH

Here, the adjoining leaves are slipped out in sequence, but with all

the same-face sides being exposed. The Slip Match produces a

uniform color because all faces have a similar light reflection.

The figure (pattern) in the wood repeats, but the grain does not match at joints. If the grain is not exactly vertical, a vertical slant may appear. If the grain is straight, the joint may not be noticeable

RANDOM MATCH

Veneer leaves are placed next to each other in a random order

and orientation, producing a "board-by-board" effect in many

types of wood. Degrees of contrast and variation may change from

panel to panel, and no attempt is made to make the panels match at the joints. Random matching is often done when a rustic look is desired.

BALANCED MATCHED

Each veneer panel face is assembled from leaves of uniform width

before edge trimming. Panels may contain an even or odd number

of leaves. To duplicate the look in adjacent panels, each leaf is

sequenced and numbered for use in adjacent panels, although the individual leaf distribution may change from panel to panel.

RUNNING MATCHED

The panel face contains however many veneer leaves it takes to

cover the panel. This is often the most economical way to match

veneer, although it comes at the expense of aesthetics.

Usually, this results in unequal widths and a non-symmetrical appearance. Horizontal grain match cannot be expected. Veneer leaves in a running match are seldom matched in adjacent panels.